April 6, 2014

Bits and pieces of Otello

An admirer sent me those radio interview links:

http://www.franceinter.fr/player/reecouter?play=874828
http://www.franceinter.fr/player/reecouter?play=874846

You all have fun at the premiere tomorrow.....
or for  those, who had the fun already http://italiansbetter2.blogspot.de/2014/04/maure-venise.html#links ,
enjoy another time.

16 comments:

  1. Thank you for posting it. By the way: what does Cecilia say in the interviews? I don´t understand French, that would be very nice, if someone can just sum up the interesting parts. Thanks and all of you, who are going to Paris - have fun! Koile

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  2. I have only listened to the first one up to now. And my French is quite rusty, so forgive me when I didn't understand it correctly.

    She talks about Opera seria and opera buffa, she talks about her curiosity about the people who influenced the famous ones, that's why she wants to sing composers like Steffani, Salieri etc. She says that she herself sits in the library researching the old notes. When she's touring, there are of course people helping her. The interviewer asks her if she ever has doubts when she stands up for something new. She says, there were always doubts, but on the other hand, there's always the music. As soon as the music talks to us profoundly, one has 'to do it'.

    She says, music is my religion.

    She talks about music and CDs versus Spotify etc. She says one has to accept that the internet exists, sticking to the old things leads to nowhere, one has to think about other solutions. There are still many people who want to own disks as there is more information (booklet) to receive than via Spotify.

    She talks about Italy, she complains about the bad musical education and the closing opera houses. Seh sounds very concerned and sad about this.

    Asked only one word: Diva? She starts talking about Maria Malibran. :) Then she says, she has not the time for being a Diva in the meaning of a capricious (right word??) woman.

    I will translate the other one as soon as I have the time.

    Charlotte


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    1. Congratulations Charlotte! You understood correctly. It’s perfect and nicely put. “Capricious” is the right word. Needless to say Cecilia’s words are so true and inspiring. According to GF, the "répétition générale" on Saturday evening was a huge success.

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  3. Hello Charlotte, thank you so much for the summary. I listend to the interview and caught words like "Internet" and "Diva" and Maria Malibran, but it made no sense to me. I also got the change of her voice, when they asked her about Italy (I got the word Italy) and she really soften her voice. You could feel, how she feels, without understanding the language. That fascinates me - she can be an open book! Koile

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    1. Yes Koile, you are absolutely right. Cecilia is an open book, an inexhaustible book of wonders, and she can be so moving at times as you say, so simple and yet so deep.

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  4. Now to the second one, I'll do my best, Gil and the other French, don't hesitate to correct me:

    One of the interviewers asks her, why she waited so long with singing an Opera seria of Rossini (though the Opere serie where much more popular in his times than the Opere buffe). She answers, first of all, a young woman enjoys more to sing a Rosina or Cenerentola rather than a tragic role. Furthermore she says, one needs a different ability of acting in a role like Desdemona as well as a vocal maturity, and that's why she waited for it.

    She can imagine to sing other Opere Serie di Rossini. She finds the Desdemona particularly touching, because Rossini's Desdemona fights for love. Plus the still very current topic of racism.

    They talk about period instruments, she explains that she wants to communicate with the instruments, a true conversation can develop. She has the impression that modern instruments are like a wall. It's like a fight. But music is the exchange of ideas, it's improvisation, being part of one another.

    Listen at 9:37. :) This is shouting against a wall of instruments, no communication possible.

    One has to serve the music.

    She likes to work with Jean-Christophe Spinosi as well as with Moshe Leiser/Patrice Caurier. The latter she says are absolutely inspired by the music, they are capable to show the many layers of a character by putting the scene into another time for example. (I'm not sure if I got this correctly.)

    The interviewer asks her how she trains her voice. The other one throws in 'By singing 'je t'aaaiiime' ' whereupon she starts laughing. Training her voice by laughing? She agrees: Laughing is good for the voice, the heart, the soul. One should laugh at least 5 minutes a day, if possible.

    Singing, she says, is training. Choosing the right repertoire. Singing every day? Yes, but not many hours in a row, like a pianist could do. One has to make breaks every once in a while, because the voice is a fragile instrument.

    Somehow (I didn't get this) they talk about not going by plane, she says 'Because I'm afraid' and this sounds like a little girl (15:37).

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    1. The interview condensation you made is very fine Charlotte. Actually, at the end, when Cecilia speaks about voice as a fragile instrument, she adds that air conditioned is quite dangerous for the voice. Then the interviewer asks her whether it’s for that reason she doesn’t go by plane, and she replies jokingly, “No, it’s because I am afraid!”, though the main reason is for protecting her voice.

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    2. Hello Charlotte and Gil, thank you for helping me out with this interview. It is so interesting and funny to do: I am only listening to the sound of Cecilia´s voice and now while I know what she is talking about, it makes sense. For example this "afraid of planes" thing: I knew, something is going on (change of voice and sound). Yes, it has it´s moments to listen to Cecilia in a foreign language and just concentrate on her voice. But of course it´s better to understand her! Greetings Koile

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  5. Thanks Charlotte, nice of you to translate this, Cecilia is so honist and pure in her answering.

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  6. Thank you, Gil, sometimes, it's too fast for me. But actually, I love to listen to French again - looong time ago that I learnt it...

    I have another link, a review written by the well known Il Tenero Momento and an interview with John Osborn:
    Review
    Interview

    Furthermore, Cecilia received another award by International Opera Awards in London for the best new opera production of the year. Read this German article. And the Züricher Opernhaus also won this award for the best Opera Company of the Year. See all winners here.

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  7. Here is a link to the New York Times review.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/16/arts/international/cecilia-bartoli-returns-to-paris-in-rossinis-otello.html?_r=0

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    1. That's in the review section already -:).

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    2. I'll try to remember to look there next time.

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  8. Hi everybody, I wrote an review about me watching "Otello" on DVD! (Had no chance to travell to Paris, the DVD is a good Substitute). You will find it in the Review-Section. The text is still in German, but i will translate it. So far enjoy! Happy Easter! Koile

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  9. My last review : http://italiansbetter2.blogspot.fr/2014/04/bartoli-et-spinosi-de-retour-enfin.html

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    1. Hello Georg-Friedrich, would be great and helpful if you can sum up your french text in a few english words. Because I am eager to know, what you are writing about. Thanks and greetings, Koile

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If you want to post a link to a review or a video/audio contribution, please also add a comment in the respective section of the forum. Thanks.